Usage – ways of dressing and others

After exploring the different factors that are involved in decorative development, some examples allow the evocation of the role and place that fabrics play in the social life, as marks of identity, such as elements of profane or religious rituals or as vectors of artistic expression.

 
The majority of decorated fabrics that enter into social rituals, or have a symbolic function with their patterns or colours, are mainly clothing but they can also have other profane or ceremonial uses.

  • veil

    veil

  • turban

    turban

  • turban

    turban

  • bodice

    bodice

  • tunic

    tunic

  • skirt

    skirt

  • belt

    belt

  • tablecloth

    tablecloth

  • partridge cage over

    partridge cage over

  • funeral ritual

    funeral ritual

  • funeral ritual

    funeral ritual

  • marriage ritual

    marriage ritual

  • marriage ritual

    marriage ritual

  • mark of power

    mark of power


tunic

tunic

Zoroastrian woman’s tunic, qamis Iran, Isphahan, end of 19th – beginning of 20th century Silk, twisted silk thread for the embroidery 71.1961.65.1

These tunics were worn by Zoroastrian women with full trousers and veils leaving the face free, often decorated itself with reserve patterns on a red background. Their clothing sets them apart from Moslem women. Made of taffeta with alternated cutting for the skirt which came up to a dark red bodice, there were embroidered panels on a green and blue background and dyed reserve panels put together after the design. A woven braid edges the neckline, the bottom of the skirt and the wrists. Reserves were made by knot tying for two sizes of circles and by sewing on small pleats before and gathering. Dyeing is done successively in two yellow and green baths. After dyeing, some indigo highlights are marked onto the patterns. These ones are called dandani «with teeth », a word which refers to the or gol-e Hindi «Indian flowers » technique. This last word underlines the close relations between the Zoroastrians of Iran and those who emigrated to India. 146x113 cm